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Corruption impedes success of climate Negotiations

Nigeria
The Guardian
29/10/2010

Lagos, Nigeria - With governments committing huge sums to tackle the world's most pressing problems, from the instability of financial markets to climate change and poverty, corruption remains an obstacle to achievi ng much needed progress, according to Transparency International's 2010 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), a measure of domestic, public sector corruption released Tuesday.

According to a statement from the Berlin-based global anti-corruption watchdog, obtained by PANA here, the 2010 CPI shows that nearly three quarters of the 178 countries in the index score below five, on a scale from (perceived to be highly corrupt) to 10 (perceived to have low levels of corruption), indicating a serious corruption problem.
'These results signal that significantly greater efforts must go into strengthening governance across the globe. With the livelihoods of so many at stake, governments' commitments to anti-corruption, transparency and accountability must speak through their actions. Good governance is an essential part of the solution to the global policy challenges governments face today,' the statement quoted Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International (TI), as saying.

To fully address these challenges, governments need to integrate anti-corruption measures in all spheres, from the responses to the financial crisis and climate change to commitments by the international community to eradicate poverty.
For this reason TI advocates stricter implementation of the UN Convention against Corruption, the only global initiative that provides a framework for putting an end to corruption.

'Allowing corruption to continue is unacceptable; too many poor and vulnerable people continue to suffer its consequences around the world. We need to see more enforcement of existing rules and laws. There should be nowhere to hide for the corrupt or their money,' said Labelle.

In the 2010 CPI, Denmark, New Zealand and Singapore tie for first place with scores of 9.3.
Unstable governments, often with a legacy of conflict, continue to dominate the bottom rungs of the CPI, with Afghanistan and Myanmar sharing second to last place with a score of 1.4 and with Somalia coming in last with a score of 1.1.

TI's assessment of 36 industrialised countries party to the OECD anti-bribery convention, which forbids bribery of foreign officials, reveals that as many as 20 show little or no enforcement of the rules, sending the wrong signal about their commitment to curb corrupt practices.

While corruption continues to plague fledgling states, hampering their efforts to build and strengthen institutions, protect human rights and improve livelihoods, corrupt international flows continue to be considerable.

'The results of this year's CPI show again that corruption is a global problem that must be addressed in global policy reforms. It is commendable that the Group of 20 in pursuing financial reform has made strong commitments to transparency and integr ity ahead of their November summit in Seoul,' said Labelle. 'But the process of reform itself must be accelerated.'

TI calls on the G20 to mandate greater government oversight and public transparency in all measures they take to reduce systemic risks and opportunities for corruption and fraud in the public as well as in the private sector.

El contenido de las noticias que se presentan en esta sección es responsabilidad directa de las agencias emisoras de noticias y no necesariamente reflejan la posición del Gobierno de México en este u otros temas relacionados.

    

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